FAQs

I’ve never talked to anyone. I’m used to handling things on my own. Aren’t people who go to therapy weak?

Not at all. People who ask for help know when they need it and have the ability to reach out. Everyone needs help now and then. You already have some strengths that you’ve used before, that for whatever reason isn’t working right now. Perhaps this problem feels overwhelming and is making it difficult to access your past strengths. In our work together, I’ll help you identify what those strengths are and how to implement them again in what is happening now.

What’s the difference between talking to you or my best friend or family?

The difference is between someone who can do something, and someone who has the training and experience to do that same thing professionally. A mental health professional can help you approach your situation in a new way– teach you new skills, gain different perspectives, listen to you without judgment or expectations, and help you listen to yourself. Furthermore, therapy is completely confidential. You won’t have to worry about others “knowing my business.” Lastly, if your situation provokes a great deal of negative emotion, if you’ve been confiding in a friend or family member, there is the risk that once you are feeling better you could start avoiding that person so you aren’t reminded of this difficult time in your life.

Why shouldn’t I just take medication?

Medication alone cannot solve all issues. What medication does is treat the symptoms. Our work together is designed to explore the root of the issue, dig deep into your behavior and teach strategies that can help you accomplish your personal and/or relational goals.

Medication can be effective and is sometimes needed in conjunction with therapy.

How does it work? What do I have to do in sessions?

Because each person has different issues and goals for therapy, therapy will be different depending on the individual. I tailor my therapeutic approach to your specific needs

How long will it take?

Unfortunately, this is not possible to say in a general FAQs page. Everyone’s circumstances are unique to them and the length of time therapy can take to allow you to accomplish your goals depends on your desire for personal development, your commitment, and the factors that are driving you to seek therapy in the first place.

What if I have an emergency?

If you experience an emergency, call Dr. Henderson immediately at 585-329-8554. If I am not available to talk with you, especially after hours and on weekends, leave a detailed message and call 911 or go directly to the nearest emergency room.
Suicide Crisis Telephone Numbers:
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline – 800-273-TALK (8255) or TTY 800-799-4889
Monroe County Lifeline – 585-275-5151/800-310-1160 or TTY 585-275-2700

How quickly can I get an appointment?

In an effort to make scheduling initial and ongoing appointments as simple as possible, I utilize an online scheduling calendar. For first time patients, feel free to use this tool to schedule your initial appointment. Please know, however, that in order to make sure that you get connected with the right therapist as quickly as possible, I will follow up with a phone call to take a few minutes to talk about whether I am likely to best meet your needs. If I am not, I will gladly provide some alternative options. During this phone call I will also give you detailed directions to my office.

I know that sometimes getting an appointment as soon as possible is of utmost importance. If you the availability posted does not work for you, please do not hesitate to reach out by phone or email. Initiating therapy is a big step, and I do all I can to make this happen as quickly as possible.

Is what I talk about confidential?

Confidentiality is one of the most important components between a client and psychotherapist. Successful therapy requires a high degree of trust with highly sensitive subject matter that is usually not discussed anywhere but the therapist’s office. Every therapist should provide a written copy of their confidential disclosure agreement, and you can expect that what you discuss in session will not be shared with anyone. This is called “Informed Consent”. Sometimes, however, you may want your therapist to share information or give an update to someone on your healthcare team (your Physician, Naturopath, Attorney), but by law your therapist cannot release this information without obtaining your written permission.

However, state law and professional ethics require therapists to maintain confidentiality except for the following situations:

* Suspected past or present abuse or neglect of children, adults, and elders to the authorities, including Child Protection and law enforcement, based on information provided by the client or collateral sources.

* If the therapist has reason to suspect the client is seriously in danger of harming him/herself or has threated to harm another person.



Sunset Boulevard
Pittsford, NY 14534

LindsayHenderson@DrLindsayHenderson.com
(585) 329-8554

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